Plants are Our Energetic Allies

dandelion-54314_640

I have always found a deep energetic connection in Nature and her plants.

Sometimes I find myself getting a bit disconnected, but she always calls me back. The flowers, trees, and plants send their loving medicine to me, even if I’m not listening or I don’t fully know how to receive it.

A few years ago, I started receiving messages from the plants during energy healing sessions. I would get an image of a plant or a tree and understand on a deep level that this plant offered medicine that was needed for that particular situation or person. It wasn’t that the person needed to consume the plant, I simply needed to call upon that plant’s energy to allow the energetic plant medicine to flow through and help healing take place.

When this first began happening, I was fascinated! I would look the plant up after the healing session to see what healing properties it held. I always found that the plant was ideally matched in some way to the concerns of that particular client or situation.

In many cases, I was personally led to the perfect herb to help me heal from a particular health issue or a flower essence to help shift an emotional block. This all led me strongly back to my lifelong fascination with Nature, plants, herbs, flowers and generally with being outside and connecting with the Divine Life Force all around us. I returned to making my own herbal remedies and began using plant energetics in my life on a regular basis.

Life does tend to get busy and things happen that seem to come out of nowhere. Sometime in the last year, I found myself so caught up in the tasks of everyday life that I began to forget the plants and flowers again. I still called upon them on occasion, but I could feel myself ignoring my need to re-connect, insisting that I was too busy. Each time I did this, I felt a part of my inner self wither and die. I felt sick inside. And I began to actually feel physically sick, in pain, and thinking in a lesser vibration. I was shutting myself off from that which fed my life force.

One day, in prayer and meditation, I asked to be connected to and nourished by the River of Life. I often do this, but this day I was feeling lost. I suddenly felt a warm, motherly presence that I recognized as the Divine Feminine Aspect of Life—or what many may call Mother Mary. She seemed to be all around me and within me. She said to me, “The River of Life is inside of you and all around you. You are never separate from it. You only need to breathe to remember your connection to it. It is with you always and you can never part from it. You are swimming in it.”

I felt an immense peace. And I remembered the flowers and plants. I remembered my connection was in all of life, on both an energetic level and a physical level. Yet, I had to find my way back to actually applying it, undoing the blocks I had built up in body and mind.

Around that same time, the plants began visiting me in my dreams. First, there was chickweed and calendula. Then dandelion and violet. Soon nettle joined, and then oat straw. Each time a plant would show up, I felt instantly lighter and freer. They were working with me on an emotional level. I also knew enough about these plant’s properties to realize that they were ideal for the physical issues that I was having.

Once the dandelions, chickweed, and violets made their arrival this spring, I went to visit them in person, to pick some for physical medicine and to receive their healing presence. The simple scent of them each time is enough to heal my heart and mind!  Sitting with them in ordinary silent prayerful communion heals my spirit and reminds me of my truth. Consuming them as food, teas and tinctures has been deeply healing to my body as well.

I have returned to my practices of communing with the plants, trees, and the Earth. They are my connection to the Divine, and they are my medicine—on so many levels. It has been the experiences that I speak of here that have encouraged me to teach my Herbal Basics Class this summer. And more classes later on plant energetics. I have felt the nudge for a long time and I am so glad the Divine Mother opened my heart to listen!

Blessings,

Angie

angie-webster-healing.thinkific.com

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Infinite Reiki, Infinite Healing

Infinite Reiki, Infinite Healing by Angie Webster

Infinite Reiki, Infinite Healing by Angie Webster

We all have the ability to heal…

A true healing comes from within.

It’s true. While others can support us in our healing and offer us tools to assist us, the real healing can only happen from inside of us. Once we make the inner shift, the illness or pain falls away and our perception changes.

Every one of us is born with life force energy and we are all connected to a much larger Life Force Energy–no matter what name you give that or how you look at it. While we forget that we are energy beings, we can begin to make a conscious effort to explore this and remember. That is what I learned on my own journey out of many years of multiple chronic health issues. I found that when I shifted my awareness and understanding to this energy, I was able to begin healing. It led me to Reiki, which improved my understanding of energy even more.

Infinite Reiki, Infinite Healing is my new book, which has now been released on Kindle and paperback. It offers simple tools and over a dozen energy exercises to help you begin to learn how to access and work with energy in many ways in everyday life. I share how I began to learn about energy, my journey with being ill and the basics of energy medicine, as well.

Available on Kindle: http://tinyurl.com/q7s9tom
Available in paperback: http://tinyurl.com/qh3lrns

Elderberry Syrup

elderberriesElderberry syrup is very easy to make at home and is a wonderful and tasty way to keep your immune system strong during the winter months or whenever viruses start making the rounds. It can be taken as a daily preventative dose or the dose can be increased during illness or after exposure to help you fight off the nasties. It only takes about an hour to make, costs about $3 for a quart or so and lasts for up to six months in the fridge. Take a teaspoon to a Tablespoon daily for preventative measures and up to a Tablespoon every hour during an illness, until symptoms subside or for the first 24 hours after an exposure to a virus or a bacterial infection. *NOTE*This is not meant to be a substitute for medical advice or treatment. If you or a family member are ill, please follow standard precautions and all advice given to you by your health care professional.

3 1/2 cups water

2/3 cup dried elderberries

about 1-2 inches fresh ginger root, cut up

1- 1 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon cloves

1 cup raw honey

1/4-1/2 cup organic apple cider vinegar (optional, but adds immune boosting benefits)

Add all but honey and ACV to pot and bring to a boil, cover with lid and reduce to a simmer for 45 minutes to 1 hour. Strain off liquid into a bowl and discard berries, herbs and ginger. Cool in fridge for an hour or so, then add honey and ACV, if using. Store in a glass jar with a lid, in fridge. Keeps for up to six months. Take a teaspoon to a Tablespoon daily for preventative use or a Tablespoon an hour when ill until symptoms subside.

Adding other herbs, such as 1/2 teaspoon to 1 teaspoon of lavender, thyme, rosemary, sage and/or peppercorns will strengthen the immune boosting properties of this syrup as well. Just add them into the water when you first put the berries on to boil and strain them off with the berries when done.

Grain Free Chicken and Dumplings

cauliflowerGrain Free Chicken and Dumplings

Comfort foods are amazing. They can remind you of a special time in your childhood and just generally soothe and heal your body, mind and spirit. My husband and I are contending with a bit of a cold today and some chicken and dumplings, like my Mom used to make sounded just right. Only grain free.

Once a month I buy 2 chickens, as well as my eggs, from a local farm that I completely trust. They are family owned and they let the chickens live a free and happy chicken life, not a caged one. They provide amazingly kind shelters for their “ladies”, as they call them and treat them like fellow family members.  I get about 4 meals and 8 cups of chicken stock from each of the chickens. Nothing goes to waste and all of the bird is honored deeply.

This recipe uses shredded chicken picked from a previously roasted whole chicken, frozen and thawed for this meal as well as stock made by boiling the bones and skin from the chicken after all the meat was removed. You could also buy chicken thighs or breast, cook it and shred it and buy chicken stock, but it’s cheaper to buy a whole chicken, roast it (or crock pot it for several hours) and then pick it clean and freeze what you don’t eat in 1 or 2 cup portions for later meals.

Grain Free Chicken and Dumplings

1 head cauliflower, cut in half

@ 2 cups shredded chicken (leftover from cooked whole bird)

4 cups chicken stock, split in half (made from bones and skin left from picked clean bird)

2 cups water

@ 2 cups chopped carrots

@ 1 cup chopped celery

@ 1 cup parsley or carrot tops (optional)

1/2 teaspoon thyme

1/2 teaspoon pepper

1 teaspoon sea salt or Himalayan salt

additional 1/4 teaspoon sea salt or Himalayan salt

1 egg

1/4 cup coconut flour

1/4 cup tapioca flour or arrowroot

 

1) Chop half of the cauliflower and add it to 2 cups of the stock and 2 cups of water in a large pot and bring to a boil. Turn down and simmer for 10 minutes.

2) While that is cooking, chop the other half head of cauliflower and run through a food processor until it is very fine and grainy looking. Add a half inch or so of water to a pan and bring to a boil, then add the cauliflower grains to the water and cook for about 5 minutes. Drain through wire mesh strainer and rinse with cool water. When cool enough, place on a doubled over piece of cheesecloth or a thin dish cloth and squeeze while twisting to get all the liquid out. Set aside in a medium bowl.

3) Pour the cauliflower and stock into a blender and liquefy to make a smooth and thick cream like base. Pour back into the pot and add carrots, celery, parsley, salt, pepper, thyme the rest of the stock and the chicken and bring back to a simmer for about another 10-15 minutes while making the dumplings.

4) Add an egg, both flours (or arrowroot) and 1/4 teaspoon salt to the cauliflower grains you set aside in the medium bowl and stir well with a spoon. Then knead with your hands for a couple minutes until it feels nicely pliable and holds together well. Only takes about 2 minutes.

5) Check on the soup. If the carrots are tender and seasonings are as you like, then form the dough ball into about 9, 1/2 inch dumplings and drop then into the soup. Let them rise to the top on their own. Put the lid on the pot and let simmer on low for about 10 minutes. Serve.

Adapted from: http://paleoparents.com/2013/guest-post-popular-paleo-cauliflower-dumplings-with-creamy-chicken-soup/

Grain Free Zucchini Muffins

Grain free zucchini muffinsI’ve recently had to make some changes in the way I cook and eat. My body has been sending me signals for awhile that it was having major issues with grains–all grains, even gluten free ones. I already knew sugars were an issue for me, but I had been ignoring that and steadily increasing my intake of various sugars for some time. My body was letting me know it couldn’t handle much more. I had to get off of the sugars again and I had to find a way to stop eating grains. This was a bummer thing to realize just as my zucchini were coming into season and berries everywhere were ripening! I wanted to bake! However, I am not one to be deterred. I have been in this place before when I had to go gluten free, and I found entirely new ways of looking at food and cooking. I have been able to do that again and I am rocking the kitchen once more! I have been making grain free, sugar free or extremely low sugar (no processed sugar) pies, cobblers, breads and muffins.
I have also learned a few things about how grains are processed in our bodies and what can make that difficult for us. In learning that, I have found that with many grains, if I soak them I have no trouble eating them. This has led to me learning how to make oat porridge (delicious!) and sourdough (makes great pancakes!), which I will be making bread from in the next day or two. Soaking grains allows them to release the nutrients, which aren’t available without soaking, and also neutralizes toxins that are naturally present in the grains. Our ancestors always did this. Only in recent modern times did we stop. Notice how in recent times our autoimmune disease have increased as well as digestive disease and gluten/grain sensitivity and celiac? There may be a correlation as the immune system is largely in the digestive tract, extending to the brain and the bloodstream.
Now that I’ve given you somewhat sciencey lesson in grains and immune health, I would like to share a new recipe I have created for grain free zucchini muffins! I made these for breakfast this morning and they are awesome! Nice and fluffy; sort of an egg like fluffiness. If you want a bit more of a grain-like feel, you could add a scant 1/4 cup of almond meal/flour to the recipe and that should achieve that for you nicely without sacrificing the airiness of the muffins. I may try that next time, just to see what it’s like.

Grain Free Zucchini Muffins
1/2 coconut flour
scant 1/4 almond flour/meal (optional, for a more grain-like texture)
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon sea salt or Himalayan salt
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ginger powder
1/4 teaspoon allspice (optional, but good)
(*Note: You could 1/2 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice in place of the previous 3 spices)
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
4 eggs, preferably pastured
3 Tablespoons raw honey or maple syrup (grade B works best for cooking)
1/4 cup unsweetened applesauce
1 small or medium zucchini, shredded (you need about 1 cup)
1/4-1/2 cup chopped walnuts (optional)

Preheat oven to 350 and prepare muffin pans with liners or by greasing well.

1) Shred the zucchini and squeeze the excess liquid out then set aside. 2) Mix the eggs, honey or syrup and applesauce in a medium bowl until well blended. 3) Add in the flour(s), the zucchini, salt, baking soda and spices, mix well. 4) If using nuts, stir those in now. 5) Fill prepared muffin cups about 2/3 full. 6) Bake 20 minutes, until a knife inserted in the middle comes out clean.

Makes 12 muffins.

5 Things I Have Learned (So Far) In My Garden

1024px-Raised_bed5 Things I Have Learned (So Far) In My Garden
This has been my first year with a vegetable garden, so I am still quite a novice. But Like most things I do, especially when they have to do with plants, herbs, nutrition and being outside, I approached it with great curiosity, spend lots of hands on time with it, and done a lot of reading and asking questions. I also follow my own gut instincts and intuition an awful lot. So far it is going very well and I have learned a lot. One of the things I have learned about gardening is you are never finished learning about gardening. I have talked to people who have grown up on farms who admit they don’t know and are still learning. That’s good, because when you think you know everything, you are officially stuck for life!
Here are some of the things I have learned so far:
1) Plant garlic in a few places around the perimeter of your garden. Onions are good as part of your border, too. The reason is, garlic naturally repel rabbits, raccoons and other animals that may want to check out what goodies you have in your garden. The bonus is you get garlic (and onions, if you plant those). Just take a clove of garlic and plant it about an inch down.
2) Plant some flowers and herbs. Even if you think you don’t have enough room, or you don’t care about flowers or herbs. It’s not for you. It’s for the beneficial insects and the multitude of ways they can help make your gardening so much easier. Also, plant a variety of veggies. Planting your garden like this draws a diversity of beneficial bugs so that if the harmful bugs show up, they are there to defend your plants by eating them. Did you know that plants send out a pheromone signal that is specific to the bug that can rescue them from the bug that is eating them? But that signal only carries so far. Having a diversity of plants and flowers helps insure that they are more likely to reach the right bugs to help. Not to mention you draw multiple pollinators! And truly, having fresh flowers in the house and fresh herbs to cook with is pretty amazing, too!
3) Don’t be afraid of fertilizer! Fertilizer is your garden’s friend. And yours, too. It nourishes your plants and it builds the fruits and vegetables into healthy, large and tasty pickings. Not only will they not be very big or taste very good without fertilizer, if your plants produce much at all, but your fruits and veggies won’t have nearly as many nutrient. The plants transfer the nutrients the get from the soil into the produce they make, so depleted, malnourished soil mans you are undernourishing yourself as well. Choose a good fertilizer that is not made from chemicals as these leach into the plant and what they produce. There are various types of compost that can be bought very inexpensively or even obtained for free. You can also find compost mixed with manure for a very low price. Some folks are fearful of using manure as fertilizer, but I think the worries of E. coli are out of context with home gardening. Wash your hands after gardening. Soak your veggies in a tub or sink of warm water and a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar, then rinse to disinfect and to remove bugs. These steps, along with the regular small exposures to your own soil will reduce any likelihood of getting sick from fertilizer. If you feel more comfortable, choose a compost with no manure or a vermiculture compost, but do fertilize!
4) Cucumbers and tomatoes need a trellis or cage! Seriously, don’t wait. Especially with cucumbers. They kind of go crazy, fast! And they wrap around everything in an effort to find something to support them. As soon as they come up, provide them with a sturdy trellis. It needn’t be anything fancy. I made mine out of strong sticks I found in the yard after a storm blew some branches down, and a little twine. I threw a trellis net over that and they are happy campers now. The same with the tomato plant. Strong sticks and twine and I built a very tall tomato cage. I have had to add a new line of twine once, but the cage has held, even with strong storms.
5) There is more than one planting season. You can plant several times and keep your garden producing throughout the season, if you choose to. I planted my first crop in the spring of broccoli, cauliflower, onions, cucumbers, zucchini, squash, potatoes, lettuce, tomatoes , carrots, and herbs. Now my onions are harvested and I just planted okra where they were. I am in the process of slowly harvesting my potatoes and I will plant something else there. As I harvest lettuce, I plant more so I continue to have more all year. There are other crops that are fine to plant even at the end of the summer to harvest in the fall.
Share with me, if you have tips! As I learn more, I will gladly share what I learn along the way. Happy growing!

Ginger Lemonade

lemons-338138_640Ginger Lemonade

A favorite way to quench thirst in the summer that serves double duty as an anti-inflammatory for over-used sore muscles is ginger lemonade. I like to keep some made up and in the fridge most of the year because we love it so much, but it’s so popular here in the summer, I have switched to a gallon jug in order to keep up with demand!

The lemon juice is a great detoxifier, which cleanses your liver and kidneys and is full of vitamin C. It also has a nice alkalinizing effect on the body, despite it being a citrus fruit and being acidic. It is very good for your digestion and will help to flush toxins in this way as well, stimulating the natural flow of normal digestive juices and enzymes which our bodies can often get sluggish in producing, leading to poor digestion.

Ginger root is an amazing natural anti-inflammatory, which works better than ibuprofen and other over the counter non steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (and better than many prescription ones as well, in my opinion!)  The bonus is it is safe and without side effects. It also has anti-bacterial and anti-viral properties and is an excellent way to boost your immune system and ward off any potential or current infections. I try to include ginger in my diet every single day. (Garlic too, for similar reasons, but that’s another post!)

Ginger soothes the stomach (including morning sickness) and digestive tract and is fantastic to take/drink when you have an upset stomach or other tummy issue. It will significantly shorten the duration of a stomach virus and lessen the symptoms. (Though if you take it daily, you may rarely or never get one at all!) It helps reduce and relieve the severity and duration of migraines, menstrual cramps, arthritis, gout and fibromyalgia pain (any pain really). It can help reduce sinus pressure, allowing them to drain. Whew!! Lots of benefits from ginger! And the truth is, I am restraining myself to keep the post short and get to the recipe! I could really go on! It’s good stuff!

To make 1 gallon of Ginger Lemonade:

4-6 inches fresh ginger root (found in most produce sections), grated or run through a food processor

5-6 lemons, juiced (NOT processed, bottled lemon juice–real lemons!)

1/2 teaspoon stevia, 1/2 cup raw honey, or other sweetener (to taste)

water

1.Using a funnel, pour the juice from the lemons into the jug or container you are using for the ginger lemonade. This may be the point you wish to add the amount of sweetener you are starting with. Start on the low side! You can always add more after all the other ingredients are added in. 2.Bring about 4 cups of water to a boil while you grate your ginger root. I use my tea pot for this as it is exactly the right size and it doesn’t take very long. 3. Put the grated ginger in a mesh wire strainer set atop a small bowl so that the ginger is cradled in the bowl. 4. Pour the boiling water into the bowl, over the mesh wire strainer with the ginger in it and allow it to steep for about 20 minutes. The idea is to make a hot ginger water that is a bit strong. 5. After about 20 minutes, pour the ginger water into the gallon jug (use the funnel). Let it cool before doing this, if you need to. Discard the grated ginger. 6. Cap and shake the jug, or mix with a spoon, if using an open container. Then fill to the top with cool water, shake again, taste and if sweet enough for you, refrigerate.

Enjoy whenever you would like a refreshment or anytime you need a boost of some of those lovely benefits from ginger or lemon. I suggest at least one glass a day. If you want to increase the health benefits, especially as an anti-inflammatory agent, try adding a teaspoon of raw, organic apple cider vinegar to your glass of ginger lemonade! I recommend Bragg’s, for taste and the benefits I see, but there are others as well.